The Complete language of Music – Foundation 3

The next important foundation to the Complete Language of Music is how to take the notes found through Music Theory and/ or found on Written Music and relate them to instruments so that they can be played.

Every instrument has set ways of playing notes. If you find the relevant information for your instrument you can then connect what you read or understand to your instrument.

In the opposite direction – when you create something you can now relate them to written music so that others can play what you have created.

You are communicating on a high level but there are more levels to go as you learn more and get closer to being able to communicate exactly what is in your mind. So how does it work?

Below are 2 diagrams –

The first diagram shows part of the fretboard of a guitar. In the bottom left hand corner is the letter E.

This is the open note (no finger on frets) of the thickest string. This also tells us that the E on the stave is the lowest sounding note the guitar can produce, with normal tuning.

The second diagram shows a section of stave with a note on it and the letter E below it. This is the same as the lowest note played on a guitar. They are the same thing represented 2 different ways. 

If use google to find the relevant information about your particular instrument look for one that tells you the note names and where they appear on the stave. Some will only tell you the note names and not where they appear on the stave which will not be as helpful.

Some instrument books will also have this information, especially Classical based tuition books. The more you get used to relating the played notes to the written note the quicker you will master written music. Enjoy.

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